Beautification Strategy Update

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Beautification is the process of making visual improvements to Vaughan through the planting of flowers, ornamental grasses, trees and shrubs in beds, planters and hanging baskets.

The City of Vaughan’s Beautification Strategy was created and approved in 2016 and implemented in 2017. The strategy provides guidance on where and how the City should focus its beautification efforts. The current strategy includes a classification system with four service levels – Premium, Enhanced, Standard and Basic – and describes how these service levels are applied to flower beds, planters and hanging baskets throughout the city. The strategy also provides guidance on which plants the City should use and standards for how often plantings will be maintained.

The City is currently in the process of updating this strategy and wants your feedback to ensure the new strategy meets the community’s needs.




How can I get involved?

We want to hear from you. What are your thoughts on the City’s horticultural assets (flowers, shrubs, trees and more) and Beautification Strategy? Have your say by:

Your feedback will inform updates to the 2016 Beautification Strategy and ensure the City continues to effectively deliver and maintain flower beds, planters, shrubs and trees that make the city beautiful. The survey will be open until Sunday, April 18.


Beautification is the process of making visual improvements to Vaughan through the planting of flowers, ornamental grasses, trees and shrubs in beds, planters and hanging baskets.

The City of Vaughan’s Beautification Strategy was created and approved in 2016 and implemented in 2017. The strategy provides guidance on where and how the City should focus its beautification efforts. The current strategy includes a classification system with four service levels – Premium, Enhanced, Standard and Basic – and describes how these service levels are applied to flower beds, planters and hanging baskets throughout the city. The strategy also provides guidance on which plants the City should use and standards for how often plantings will be maintained.

The City is currently in the process of updating this strategy and wants your feedback to ensure the new strategy meets the community’s needs.




How can I get involved?

We want to hear from you. What are your thoughts on the City’s horticultural assets (flowers, shrubs, trees and more) and Beautification Strategy? Have your say by:

Your feedback will inform updates to the 2016 Beautification Strategy and ensure the City continues to effectively deliver and maintain flower beds, planters, shrubs and trees that make the city beautiful. The survey will be open until Sunday, April 18.


  • Significant City Sites

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    31 Mar 2021
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    The proposed Significant CPhotograph of the entrance to Vaughan City Hall, with several planters filled with summer annuals lining either side of the walkway.ity Sites classification applies to sites of significant civic importance and village centres, such as Kleinburg, Maple, the Vaughan Metropolitan Centre, Vellore Village Hall, Woodbridge and Yonge Street. These are destination points for many visitors from both within and outside of Vaughan.



    Plants included in this classification

    Significant City Sites may have plant beds or planters and will typically contain:

    • native trees
    • 20 per cent perennials and grasses
    • 70 per cent annuals
    • 10 per cent shrubs


    Maintenance for this classification

    Significant City Sites will receive the highest level of maintenance, including:

    • weeding – at a minimum of 12 times per season.
    • pruning – on an annual basis.
    • mulching – on an annual basis.


    How has this classification changed from the 2016 strategy?

    The Premium Site classification within the 2016 strategy has been updated and renamed to Significant City Sites. Updates to this classification include:

    • weeding – increased from a minimum of six to a minimum of 12 times per season.
    • pruning – has not changed and will occur on an annual basis.
    • mulching – has not changed and will occur on an annual basis.



    Example: Vaughan City Hall

    Vaughan City Hall is a site of significant civic importance. It plays a critical role as Vaughan’s chief administrative building, where public meetings are held and municipal services are delivered to residents and businesses.

  • Neighbourhood Entrances and Community Hubs

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    31 Mar 2021
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    Photograph of a flower bed containing fall mums and kale, accompanied by perennial grasses and shrubbery and trees.

    The proposed Neighbourhood Entrances and Community Hubs classification applies to the existing entrances to neighbourhood communities on main roads. They have high visibility and welcome residents and visitors into the community.

    Similarly, sites at community centres and libraries are also included in this classification due to their high visibility.



    Plants included in this classification

    Neighbourhood Entrances and Community Hub sites will typically contain:

    • native trees
    • 60 per cent perennials and grasses
    • 20 per cent annuals
    • 20 per cent shrubs


    Maintenance for this classification

    Neighbourhood Entrances and Community Hub sites will receive a moderate to high level of maintenance, including:

    • weeding – at a minimum of six times per season.
    • pruning – on a biannual basis (every two years).
    • mulching – on a biannual basis (every two years).


    How has this classification changed from the 2016 strategy?

    The Enhanced Site classification within the 2016 strategy has been updated and renamed to Neighbourhood Entrances and Community Hubs. Updates to this classification include:

    • an increase in perennials and grasses from 50 per cent to 60 per cent.
    • a decrease in annuals from 30 per cent to 20 per cent.
    • weeding – increased from a minimum of three to a minimum of six times per season.
    • pruning – has not changed and will occur on a biannual basis.
    • mulching – has not changed and will occur on a biannual basis.



    Example: Rutherford and Forest Fountain

    The intersection of Rutherford Road and Forest Fountain has high visibility and welcomes residents and visitors to the community of Sonoma Heights. As the entrance point to a neighbourhood off a major road, this site warrants the Neighbourhood Entrance and Community Hub classification.

  • Boulevards and Side Streets

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    31 Mar 2021
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    Photograph of Clark Avenue, with clean and tidy green grass and trees on either side.

    The proposed Boulevards and Side Streets classification applies to sites located on streets adjacent to major roads that border a community but are not an entry point. This classification also applies to secondary roads inside communities.



    Plants included in this classification

    Boulevards and Side Street sites will typically contain:

    • native trees
    • sod and turf


    Maintenance for this classification

    Boulevards and Side Street sites will receive a moderate to low level of maintenance, including:

    • grass cutting – at a minimum of every two weeks.
    • tree pruning – lifecycle prune every seven years.

    At locations with existing shrubs, maintenance will include:

    • weeding – at a minimum of three times per season.
    • shrub pruning – every three years, as applicable.


    How has this classification changed from the 2016 strategy?

    The Standard Site classification within the 2016 strategy has been updated and renamed to Boulevards and Side Streets. Updates to this classification include:

    • weeding – increased from a minimum of one to a minimum of three times per season.
    • shrub pruning – has not changed and will occur every three years.
    • mulching – has not changed and will occur every three years.



    Example: Clark Avenue from Dufferin Street to Bathurst Street

    Clark Avenue, between Dufferin and Bathurst streets, is a boulevard located within the community of Thornhill. It is an internal block street that primarily serves the local community and has significantly less traffic volume and visibility than a major road. It is classified as a Boulevard and Side Street site, planted with sod and trees on either side of the road.

  • Medians and Roundabouts

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    31 Mar 2021
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    Photograph of a roundabout containing a perennial pollinator garden accompanied by perennial grasses.

    This proposed classification applies to medians and roundabouts located on both major and secondary roads.

    The goal is to create pollinator gardens at these sites. Pollinator plants support birds, butterflies, bees, beetles and bats by providing both food and shelter. Supporting these species is important as they are responsible for pollinating our crops and, in turn, growing the food we eat.

    These types of planting require minimal maintenance, which also keeps our crews safe by reducing the amount of time they need to work roadside. Less maintenance also means fewer lane shutdowns, lessening the impact on your daily commute.



    Material for this classification

    Median and roundabout sites will typically contain:

    • pollinator plants (e.g. Beebalm, Hairy Beardtongue, Canadian Columbine, Primrose, Goldenrod, Lavender).
    • ground cover plants (e.g. Thyme, Vinca, English Ivy, Lady’s Mantle, Snow in Summer Ground phlox).
    • grasses (e.g. Feather Reed Grass, Prairie Dropseed, Japanese Forest Grass, Fescue).


    Maintenance for this classification

    Medians and roundabouts would be weeded a minimum of one time per season and would be mulched once at planting.

    How has this classification changed from the 2016 strategy?

    Medians and Roundabouts are a new classification proposed within the Beautification Strategy Update.



    Example: Westmount Roundabout

    Westmount Boulevard is a neighbourhood street within the community of Thornhill. Westmount Boulevard experiences significantly less traffic than a main road. The traffic calming roundabout provides an ideal location for pollinator planting, adding beautification to the area and promoting pollinator habitats with low maintenance required.