Building the Humber Trail

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The City of Vaughan has partnered with the Toronto and Region Conservation Authority (TRCA) to complete a feasibility study to explore ways to expand the Humber Trail and connect a seven-kilometre gap between Boyd Conservation Area and Steeles Avenue West.

The Humber Trail Feasibility Study started in May 2018 and explores potential routes for the new trail. The study aims to select options that balance the current and future recreational and transportation needs of residents with the ecological functions of the natural heritage system of the Humber River Valley, ensuring the protection and enhancement of environmental features and functions.

The project is now entering its next phase and the City would like to engage the public on findings to date.


Decorative image with "Get Involved" written on it.

How can I get involved?

We want to hear from you! What are your thoughts on the proposed route options within the Humber Trail Feasibility Study? Have your say by:

  • watching the video to learn more about the feasibility study and proposed route options.
  • using the interactive map to explore route alternatives and provide your thoughts.
  • completing a survey to provide input into which of five identified priority projects should be constructed first.
  • sharing your ideas on how to encourage more residents to use Vaughan’s trails.

The City will use your feedback to update the feasibility study and prepare a report with recommendations to be presented to Vaughan Council in fall 2021. Moving forward to detailed design and construction will be subject to securing funding for implementation. This feedback opportunity is open until Wednesday, June 30 – we are looking forward to hearing from you.



The City of Vaughan has partnered with the Toronto and Region Conservation Authority (TRCA) to complete a feasibility study to explore ways to expand the Humber Trail and connect a seven-kilometre gap between Boyd Conservation Area and Steeles Avenue West.

The Humber Trail Feasibility Study started in May 2018 and explores potential routes for the new trail. The study aims to select options that balance the current and future recreational and transportation needs of residents with the ecological functions of the natural heritage system of the Humber River Valley, ensuring the protection and enhancement of environmental features and functions.

The project is now entering its next phase and the City would like to engage the public on findings to date.


Decorative image with "Get Involved" written on it.

How can I get involved?

We want to hear from you! What are your thoughts on the proposed route options within the Humber Trail Feasibility Study? Have your say by:

  • watching the video to learn more about the feasibility study and proposed route options.
  • using the interactive map to explore route alternatives and provide your thoughts.
  • completing a survey to provide input into which of five identified priority projects should be constructed first.
  • sharing your ideas on how to encourage more residents to use Vaughan’s trails.

The City will use your feedback to update the feasibility study and prepare a report with recommendations to be presented to Vaughan Council in fall 2021. Moving forward to detailed design and construction will be subject to securing funding for implementation. This feedback opportunity is open until Wednesday, June 30 – we are looking forward to hearing from you.



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Explore the Humber Trail route alternatives

19 days

This interactive map shows the Humber Trail Feasibility Study Area and proposed trail options for connecting the seven-kilometre gap between Boyd Conservation Park in the north to Steeles Avenue West in the south. The feasibility study has divided the missing link in the Humber Trail into five study segments, which are organized from north to south and as follows (limit of each segment is depicted by the red line):

  • Segment one – Pine Grove Road to Boyd Conservation Area 
  • Segment two – Thistlewood Avenue to Pine Grove Road 
  • Segment three – Highway 7 to Thistlewood Avenue 
  • Segment four – Highway 407 to Highway 7 
  • Segment five – Steeles Avenue West to Highway 407


We want your input! 

Click on the Add Pin (+) button in the menu and drag a pin to add a "note" and provide us with comments on any of the following topics:

  • Use the blue pin to tell us what you like about any of the proposed route options. 
  • Use the yellow pin to identify points of interest you think we should consider in designing and building the trail.
  • Use the red pin to share potential challenges or concerns you have with any of the proposed trail routes.

 

The route alternatives under consideration are as follows:

  • Segment One: This segment connects Boyd Conservation Park to Pine Grove Road. The trail starts at the southern end of the current Humber Trail and travels south using an existing maintenance path. The trail crosses the Humber River via a new bridge that will replace the existing 100-year-old Bowstring bridge, and continues under Langstaff Road through green space (as shown on the map in purple). An alternative option would be to connect to Langstaff Road (orange), after which the trail would become a multi-use path running alongside Islington Avenue to Doctors McLean District Park (green). Opportunities to celebrate the Bowstring bridge as a historical feature will be explored. 
  • Segment Two: This segment connects Pine Grove Road south to Doctors McLean District Park. The first option (purple) is through the green space alongside the old mill race waterway.  The second option continues the multi-use pathway running alongside Islington (green) 
  • Segment Three: This segment connects Doctors McLean District Park to Highway 7. The trail has several route options that form part of the Riverwalk Trail within Doctors McLean District Park. The main route (green) crosses the river and uses an existing pathway in Nort Johnston District Park, which will be widened. A safe and accessible route through the public parking lot will also be built.
  • Segment Four: This segment connects Highway 7 to Highway 407 through green space. Here, the route (yellow) travels beneath Highway 7 via an underpass and through Legion Park. The trail will then cross the Humber River (green), travel through the hydro corridor south of the river and turn to meet the Highway 407 bridge east of the river. An alternative route (purple) starts south of Highway 7, travels around the Humber River and wetlands and then joins an existing service access road that runs parallel to Highway 407. A second alternative route (orange) crosses the river twice as it travels directly south towards the Highway 407 bridge west of the river. A third alternative (blue) is a multi-use pathway that bypasses crossing the Humber River by travelling alongside Islington Ave.
  • Segment Five: This segment connects Steeles Avenue West to Highway 407 and the Toronto trail network. One alternative (green) crosses over the river via a temporary construction access bridge which will need to be upgraded if made permanent. From there, the trail continues to Thackeray Park along the top of the landfill site and, through a series of switchbacks, connects to the Steeles West Ave bridge west of the river. A second alternative (purple) travels through green space to a service access road, crossing the river north of Steeles Ave West to connect with the City of Toronto's trail system. 


Personal information in this form is collected under the authority of the Municipal Act, 2001 and will be used for the purpose of the Vaughan Humber Trail Feasibility Project, specifically for geographically mapping out the interest for trails in Vaughan and using this data as evidence to support the need and desire for the future trail development. Questions about this collection can be directed to the City’s Parks and Open Space Planning team within the Parks Infrastructure Planning and Development department via email at parksplanning@vaughan.ca or via phone at 905-832-2281.